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Covid-19 e animali selvatici

I ricercatori cercano di capire l'impatto del virus Covid-19 sugli animali selvatici

A frozen Hollow Rock sits on Lake Superior in Grand Portage, Minn. on March 3, 2022. (AP Photo/Emma H. Tobin)
A wildlife team covers a young buck's head with a cloth to help calm it before testing the deer for the coronavirus and taking other biological samples in Grand Portage, Minn. on Wednesday, March 2, 2022. Scientists are concerned that the COVID-19 virus could evolve within animal populations – potentially spawning dangerous viral mutants that could jump back to people, spread among us and reignite what for now seems like a waning crisis. (AP Photo/Laura Ungar)
The sun begins to set over Hollow Rock on frozen Lake Superior in Grand Portage, Minn. on March 3, 2022. (AP Photo/Emma H. Tobin)
FILE - In this Monday, Feb. 8, 2021, file photo, a visitor with a mask observes an orangutan in an enclosure at the Schoenbrunn Zoo in Vienna, Austria. Around the world, scientists and veterinarians are racing to protect animals from the coronavirus, often using the same playbook for minimizing disease spread among people. That includes social distancing, health checks and a vaccine for some zoo animals. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak, File)
A young buck peaks out from under a blanket while in a Clover deer trap. A wildlife team is testing the animal for the coronavirus and taking other biological samples in Grand Portage, Minn. on March 2, 2022. The COVID-19 virus has been confirmed in wildlife in at least 24 U.S. states, including Minnesota. Recently, an early Canadian study showed someone in nearby Ontario likely contracted a highly mutated strain from a deer. (AP Photo/Laura Ungar)
FILE - In this Sept. 16, 2019, file photo, Sandra, a 33-year-old orangutan, stands in her enclosure at the former city zoo now known as Eco Parque, in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Around the world, scientists and veterinarians are racing to protect animals from the coronavirus, often using the same playbook for minimizing disease spread among people. That includes social distancing, health checks and a vaccine for some zoo animals. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko, File)
E.J. Isaac, Roger Deschampe Jr., and Frank Manthey, who work in resource management for the Grand Portage Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, take biological samples from a deer they caught in a Clover trap on March 2, 2022 in Grand Portage, Minn.. These samples, including a COVID-19 test on the animal, will be sent to scientists for research. (AP Photo/Emma H. Tobin)
FILE - In this Monday, Sept. 2, 2019, file photo, a silverback mountain gorilla named Segasira walks in Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. Conservationists are worried about the coronavirus spreading among wild great apes, but aren't currently planning a vaccination campaign. Instead, they are going to extreme measures to ensure that human trackers and researchers visiting the animals aren't spreading disease. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
FILE - In this Saturday, March 14, 2020 file photo, health officials inspect bats to be confiscated and culled in the wake of coronavirus outbreak at a live animal market in Solo, Central Java, Indonesia. The World Health Organization said Friday May 8, 2020, that although a market in the Chinese city of Wuhan selling live animals likely played a significant role in the emergence of the new coronavirus, it does not recommend that such live markets be shut down globally. (AP Photo, File)
FILE - In this July 29, 2008, file photo, a rhesus macaque monkey grooms another on Cayo Santiago, known as Monkey Island, off the eastern coast of Puerto Rico. Since 1938, the 37-acre island has served as a research colony where the monkeys, originally from India, are studied. Even as companies recruit tens of thousands of people for larger COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine studies in the summer of 2020, behind the scenes scientists still are testing ferrets, monkeys and other animals in hopes of clues to those basic questions — steps that in a pre-pandemic era would have been finished first. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)

Un team di ricercatori statunitensi sta verificando se e come il Covid 19 stia colpendo gli animali selvatici, prelevando campioni biologici. La presenza del virus è stata confermata nella fauna selvatica in almeno 24 stati degli Stati Uniti. Recentemente, un altro studio ha mostrato come anche in Canada, nella provincia dell’Ontario, ci siano tracce di un ceppo mutato del virus.

Nel frattempo, in tutto il mondo scienziati e veterinari stanno cercando di proteggere come possibile gli animali dal coronavirus, con distanziamento, controlli sanitari e vaccino per alcuni degli animali negli zoo. (AP Photo/Laura Ungar/Ronald Zak, File)

 

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