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Cina, segnali di distensione a 50 anni dalla visita di Nixon

Un segnale di distensione da parte del ministro degli esteri cinese verso gli Usa mentre si aggrava lo scenario di un conflitto possibile tra Nato e Russia sulla questione Ucraina

In this April 21, 2013 photo, the top of the line Hong Qi L9 is displayed near an image of then Chinese leader Mao Zedong meeting then U.S. President Richard Nixon at the Shanghai International Automobile Industry Exhibition (AUTO Shanghai) in Shanghai, China. China is reviving the illustrious Red Flag marque, better known at home by its Chinese name, Hong Qi, courtesy of a government-backed program to promote domestic brands that dovetails neatly with efforts to step-up China’s diplomatic profile, partly through a greater emphasis on the pomp and circumstance accompanying state visits. The L9, is reserved for Chinese state leaders, flaunts a 6.4-meter (21-foot) armored chassis, suicide doors that open backward, and a price tag reported at around $1 million. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
In this Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016 photo, campaign buttons are on display in the museum at the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum in Yorba Linda, Calif. The museum will reopen Friday, Oct. 14, following a $15 million makeover aimed at bringing the country’s 37th president closer to younger generations less familiar with his groundbreaking trip to China or the Watergate scandal. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
In this Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016 photo, Tayron Santos cleans the newly-installed wall mural of former President Richard Nixon in the lobby area of the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum in Yorba Linda, Calif. The museum will reopen Friday, Oct. 14, following a $15 million makeover aimed at bringing the country’s 37th president closer to younger generations less familiar with his groundbreaking trip to China or the Watergate scandal. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
FILE - In this Feb. 24, 1972, file photo, President Richard Nixon, with Chinese guides and interpreters, stands on the Great Wall of China outside Peking. Richard Nixon made the historic journey to meet Chinese leader Mao Zedong in part paved by a U.S. pingpong delegation that traveled to Beijing a year earlier. (AP Photo/File)
FILE - In this Feb. 28, 1972, file photo, then U.S. President Richard Nixon, right, is serious-faced as he eats with chopsticks with then Chinese Premier Chou En-lai in Shanghai, China. Nixon became the first American president to visit Communist China. (AP Photo, File)
FILE - In this Feb. 24, 1972, file photo, U.S. President Richard Nixon with Chinese guides and interpreters stand on the Great Wall of China on the outskirts of Beijing. Four decades after the U.S. established diplomatic ties with communist China, the relationship between the two is at a turning point. (AP Photo/File)
FILE - In this Feb. 21, 1972, file photo, Chinese communist party leader Mao Zedong, left, and U.S. President Richard Nixon shake hands as they meet in Beijing, China. Tossed into the middle of a potential thawing in U.S. relations with China, Judy Bochenski and her American ping pong teammates helped deliver one of the great diplomatic coups of their time. Their hastily arranged trip for exhibitions in three Chinese cities helped part the Red Curtain and open the way to a new world order that included China. It worked so well that President Richard Nixon would get on Air Force One the next year to make a state visit to China that enthralled the world.(AP Photo/File)
FILE - Then First lady Pat Nixon watches behind him, then U.S. President Richard Nixon shakes hands with a Chinese girl in Beijing on Feb. 24, 1972 during his tour of historic sites of the Chinese capital. At the height of the Cold War, U.S. President Richard Nixon flew into communist China's center of power for a visit that over time would transform U.S.-China relations and China's position in the world in ways that were unimaginable at the time. (AP Photo, File)
FILE - Framed in the opening of a wall, then U.S. President Richard Nixon and then Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai walks past as they tour Hangzhou in the eastern Chinese province of Zhejiang on Feb. 26, 1972. At the height of the Cold War, U.S. President Richard Nixon flew into communist China's center of power for a visit that over time would transform U.S.-China relations and China's position in the world in ways that were unimaginable at the time. (AP Photo, File)
FILE - Then U.S. President Richard Nixon, right, is serious-faced as he eats with chopsticks next to then Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai in Shanghai on February 28, 1972. At the height of the Cold War, U.S. President Richard Nixon flew into communist China's center of power for a visit that over time would transform U.S.-China relations and China's position in the world in ways that were unimaginable at the time. (AP Photo, File)
FILE - Then U.S. President Richard Nixon and then Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai review Chinese troops at Nixon's departure from Beijing to Hangchow to continue his China visit, Feb. 26, 1972. First lady Pat Nixon and National Securty adviser Henry Kissinger are seen walking behind Nixon and Zhou. At the height of the Cold War, U.S. President Richard Nixon flew into communist China's center of power for a visit that over time would transform U.S.-China relations and China's position in the world in ways that were unimaginable at the time. (AP Photo, File)
FILE - Then U.S. President Richard Nixon and then China's Premier Zhou Enlai join the applause at a gymnastic show in Beijing on Feb. 23, 1972 as they stand in the official box under a capacity crowd with a portrait of Chairman Mao Zedong above. First Lady Pat Nixon is seated on lower right. At the height of the Cold War, U.S. President Richard Nixon flew into communist China's center of power for a visit that over time would transform U.S.-China relations and China's position in the world in ways that were unimaginable at the time. (AP Photo, File)
FILE - Then Chinese communist party leader Mao Zedong, left, and then U.S. President Richard Nixon shake hands as they meet in Beijing on Feb. 21, 1972. At the height of the Cold War, U.S. President Richard Nixon flew into communist China's center of power for a visit that over time would transform U.S.-China relations and China's position in the world in ways that were unimaginable at the time. (AP Photo, File)
FILE - Then U.S. President Richard Nixon and then first lady Pat Nixon looks at a sculpture depicting a mythical beast on the palace grounds of Beijing's Forbidden City as heavy snow falls on Feb. 25, 1972. At the height of the Cold War, U.S. President Richard Nixon flew into communist China's center of power for a visit that over time would transform U.S.-China relations and China's position in the world in ways that were unimaginable at the time. (AP Photo, File)

Mentre si acuisce la tensione tra Russia e Usa sullo scenario europeo, fino a prefigurare scenari di una guerra imminente, arrivano segnali di distensione dalla Repubblica popolare cinese verso gli Stati Uniti a 50 anni dalla visita in Cina dell’allora presidente Richard Nixon. Uno di quegli eventi che ha segnato la storia degli ultimi decenni con la successiva entrata del gigante asiatico nel Wto.

Come riporta l’agenzia di stampa Agi, il ministro degli esteri cinese, Wang Yi, ha telefonato al segretario di Stato Usa, Antony Blinken, per dichiarare che la Cina « è disposta a gestire efficacemente le divergenze e a stabilizzare le relazioni con gli Usa sulla base dei principi di rispetto reciproco, coesistenza pacifica e cooperazione vantaggiosa per tutti».

Nelle foto Ap alcune delle immagini legate alla storica  visita di Nixon in Cina

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