Pandemia

Vaccinare i popoli dell’Himalaya

 

A health worker administers the Covishield vaccine to shepherdess Mukhti Khan as her husband Satar Khan registers his name during a vaccination drive in Tosamaidan, southwest of Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir on June 21, 2021. The challenge for health workers travelling to to long distances for vaccinating mostly shepherds and nomadic herders in the remote meadows of the Himalayan region has not been the treacherous terrain but to persuade women to get COVID-19 vaccines. Fueled by misinformation and mistrust, many residents, particularly in remote rural areas, believe that vaccines cause impotence, serious side effects and could even kill. Some simply say they do not need the shots because they’re immune to the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)
A Kashmiri shepherdess Najma Begum reacts as she receives the Covishield vaccine for COVID-19 from Masrat Farid, a healthcare worker, in Gagangeer, northeast of Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir on June 22, 2021. Farid has traveled to long distances for vaccinating mostly shepherds and nomadic herders in the remote meadows of the Himalayan region of Indian-controlled Kashmir. Her challenge has not been the treacherous terrain but to persuade women to get COVID-19 vaccines. “Everywhere we go it seems rumors reach earlier than we do, and it makes our job difficult,” Farid said recently during a vaccination campaign at a high altitude meadow. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)
Dr Tajamul Hussain Khan, chief medical officer, right, watches as a healthcare worker from his team administers a dose of Covishield vaccine to Saja Begum outside her hut during a vaccination drive in Tosamaidan, southwest of Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir on June 21, 2021. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)
Kashmiri nomads listen to Dr. Sayeed Idrees during a COVID-19 vaccination drive in Tosamaidan, southwest of Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir on June 21, 2021. The challenge for health workers travelling to to long distances for vaccinating mostly shepherds and nomadic herders in the remote meadows of the Himalayan region has not been the treacherous terrain but to persuade women to get COVID-19 vaccines. Fueled by misinformation and mistrust, many residents, particularly in remote rural areas, believe that vaccines cause impotence, serious side effects and could even kill. Some simply say they do not need the shots because they’re immune to the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)
Health workers talk to Kashmiri nomads during a COVID-19 vaccination drive in Tosamaidan, southwest of Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir on June 21, 2021. The challenge for health workers travelling to to long distances for vaccinating mostly shepherds and nomadic herders in the remote meadows of the Himalayan region has not been the treacherous terrain but to persuade women to get COVID-19 vaccines. Fueled by misinformation and mistrust, many residents, particularly in remote rural areas, believe that vaccines cause impotence, serious side effects and could even kill. Some simply say they do not need the shots because they’re immune to the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)
Dr. Tajamul-Hussain Khan, chief medical officer unsuccessfully tries to convince a Kashmiri nomad woman sitting on horse back who refused to let her 30 year old son to be vaccinated during a COVID-19 vaccination drive in Tosamaidan, southwest of Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir on June 21, 2021. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)
A team of health workers cross a stream to reach the villages on the upper reaches during a COVID-19 vaccination drive in Gund, northeast of Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir, on June 22, 2021. The challenge for health workers travelling to to long distances for vaccinating mostly shepherds and nomadic herders in the remote meadows of the Himalayan region has not been the treacherous terrain but to persuade women to get COVID-19 vaccines. Fueled by misinformation and mistrust, many residents, particularly in remote rural areas, believe that vaccines cause impotence, serious side effects and could even kill. Some simply say they do not need the shots because they’re immune to the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)
Healthcare workers Masrat Farid and her colleagues cross a stream near river Sind to reach villages on the upper reaches during a COVID-19 vaccination drive in Gagangeer, northeast of Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir on June 22, 2021. Farid has traveled to long distances for vaccinating mostly shepherds and nomadic herders in the remote meadows of the Himalayan region of Indian-controlled Kashmir. Her challenge has not been the treacherous terrain but to persuade women to get COVID-19 vaccines. “Everywhere we go it seems rumors reach earlier than we do, and it makes our job difficult,” Farid said recently during a vaccination campaign at a high altitude meadow. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)
A Kashmiri shepherd woman watches villagers being vaccinated as she stands outside her hut during a COVID-19 vaccination drive in Tosamaidan, southwest of Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir on June 21, 2021. The challenge for health workers travelling long distances for vaccinating mostly shepherds and nomadic herders in the remote meadows of the Himalayan region has not been the treacherous terrain but to persuade women to get COVID-19 vaccines. Fueled by misinformation and mistrust, many residents, particularly in remote rural areas, believe that vaccines cause impotence, serious side effects and could even kill. Some simply say they do not need the shots because they’re immune to the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)
Kashmiri villagers watch as healthcare workers vaccinate a woman during a COVID-19 vaccination drive in Gagangeer, northeast of Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir on June 22, 2021. The challenge for health workers travelling to to long distances for vaccinating mostly shepherds and nomadic herders in the remote meadows of the Himalayan region has not been the treacherous terrain but to persuade women to get COVID-19 vaccines. Fueled by misinformation and mistrust, many residents, particularly in remote rural areas, believe that vaccines cause impotence, serious side effects and could even kill. Some simply say they do not need the shots because they’re immune to the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)
Masrat Farid, a healthcare worker, successfully convinces Kulsuma Banoo to take the COVID-19 vaccine in Gagangeer, northeast of Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir on June 22, 2021. Farid has traveled to long distances for vaccinating mostly shepherds and nomadic herders in the remote meadows of the Himalayan region of Indian-controlled Kashmir. Her challenge has not been the treacherous terrain but to persuade women to get COVID-19 vaccines. “Everywhere we go it seems rumors reach earlier than we do, and it makes our job difficult,” Farid said recently during a vaccination campaign at a high altitude meadow. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)

La campagna di vaccinazione in India, uno dei Paesi più colpiti dalla pandemia, va avanti anche nell’impervia regione himalayana del Kashmir. La sfida per gli operatori sanitari che percorrono lunghe distanze per curare i pastori nomadi non è tanto il terreno di montagna, quanto la paura delle donne. A causa della disinformazione, infatti, nelle aree rurali più remote molte persone credono che i vaccini causino impotenza, gravi effetti collaterali e persino la morte. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)

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