L’oro nero rialza la testa?

La produzione mondiale di petrolio è troppo elevata, mentre la richiesta è scarsa a causa delle restrizioni del Coronavirus che hanno costretto le persone in casa per settimane. Conseguenza: i prezzi sono calati al livello più basso da decenni, finendo addirittura in negativo. Solo recentemente hanno iniziato a rimbalzare: 36 dollari al barile il Brent. Ma non tutti si fidano. Unica certezza è che in Italia il prezzo della benzina cala sempre meno di quello del petrolio: da inizio gennaio il petrolio è diminuito del 70%, mentre il prezzo alla pompa è sceso solo del 16%. (Foto AP/Charlie Riedel)

An idle oil pumping unit is silhouetted against the setting sun, Wednesday, May 20, 2020, in a field south of Oakley, Kan. Surplus global oil production coupled with reduced demand as people stay home because of coronavirus restrictions have led to the lowest oil prices in decades which have only recently started to rebound somewhat. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)
Storage tanks are shown at the Marathon Petroleum Corp. refinery in Detroit, Tuesday, April 21, 2020. The world is awash in oil, there's little demand for it and we're running out of places to put it. That in a nutshell explains this week's strange and unprecedented action in the market for crude oil futures contracts, where traders essentially offered to pay someone else to deal with the oil they were due to have delivered next month.(AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
A currency trader watches monitors at the foreign exchange dealing room of the KEB Hana Bank headquarters in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, April 22, 2020. Asian stock markets fell further Wednesday as oil prices recovered some of their record-setting losses amid anxiety about the coronavirus pandemic's mounting economic damage. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
Offshore oil drilling platforms are seen Tuesday, April 21, 2020, in Huntington Beach, Calif. Oil prices continue to drop, because very few people are flying or driving, and factories have shut amid widespread stay-at-home orders due to the coronavirus concerns. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)
The Marathon Petroleum Corp. refinery is shown in Detroit, Tuesday, April 21, 2020. The world is awash in oil, there's little demand for it and we're running out of places to put it. That in a nutshell explains this week's strange and unprecedented action in the market for crude oil futures contracts, where traders essentially offered to pay someone else to deal with the oil they were due to have delivered next month.(AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
A plane comes in for a landing behind a pumpjack Tuesday, April 21, 2020, in Oklahoma City. Oil prices continue to drop, because very few people are flying or driving, and factories have shut amid widespread stay-at-home orders due to the coronavirus concerns. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
A pumpjack is pictured as a storm moves in Tuesday, April 21, 2020, in Oklahoma City. Oil prices continue to drop, because very few people are flying or driving, and factories have shut amid widespread stay-at-home orders due to the coronavirus cencerns. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Foto LaPresse/Nicolò Campo 
2/01/2019 Torino (Italia) 
Cronaca
Benzinai
Nella foto: una pompa da benzina GPL  Photo LaPresse/Nicolò Campo 
January 02, 2019 Turin (Italy) 
News
Petrol stations
In the picture:  a LPG petrol pump
Storage is shown at the Marathon Petroleum Corp. refinery in Detroit, Tuesday, April 21, 2020. The world is awash in oil, there's little demand for it and we're running out of places to put it. That in a nutshell explains this week's strange and unprecedented action in the market for crude oil futures contracts, where traders essentially offered to pay someone else to deal with the oil they were due to have delivered next month.(AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
A pumpjack is pictured as the sun sets Tuesday, April 21, 2020, in Oklahoma City. Oil prices continue to drop, because very few people are flying or driving, and factories have shut amid widespread stay-at-home orders due to coronavirus concerns. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Storage is shown at the Marathon Petroleum Corp. refinery in Detroit, Tuesday, April 21, 2020. The world is awash in oil, there's little demand for it and we're running out of places to put it. That in a nutshell explains this week's strange and unprecedented action in the market for crude oil futures contracts, where traders essentially offered to pay someone else to deal with the oil they were due to have delivered next month.(AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
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